Saturday, April 6, 2019

International Institutions Under Strain (Part 1 - United Nations)

Circa 1945, post-WWII. World in ruins (photo from UN website).
(This is part one of a three part learning blogs with some help from my old military buddies. Here's to those who gave their lives to defend things worth defending.)









“Membership” to the United Nations (UN)
 “is open to all peace-loving States which accept the obligations contained in the [UN] Charter and, in the judgment of the [UN] Organization, are able to carry out these obligations.” 
Charter of the United Nations, Chapter II, Article 4(1). 

The UN Charter is a fascinating piece of writing. Information about its significance are readily available on the worldwide web: regarding its historical perspectives of multilateralism embodied in the great wars, its governing structures built around UN body politics, as well as the obligations of its member States to work as one towards humanity’s common aspirations. For the most part, our global consciousness has accepted the UN’s role charting a course addressing climate changes, human rights and humanitarian crises, peace keeping through its often-paralyzed Security Council, as well as addressing a salute of global problems working closely with organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO).

Among rational minds, it is common sense to peacefully coexist in ending the scourge of wars, restoring faith in fundamental human rights, and transitioning to renewable energies and better consumption practices. Yet our path presents a challenge to established economic structures and corruptible enticements cemented in our society, both of which are bedrocks of a fast-flowing stream carrying powerful corporate and private business interests. While the UN has symbolically endorsed the unity of “people, plant, and profit” in its sustainability rhetoric, it has not put much effort into incorporating economic considerations in its body politics. In fact, there is an implicit understanding that such considerations are outside of the UN Membership consciousness and left to the likes of World Trade Organization and the World Bank. That is a problem isn’t it? The UN body politics have embraced a cognitive dissonance on sustainability (people, planet, profit), and it is no wonder:
“In different areas and for different reasons, the trust of people in their political establishments, the trust of states among each other, the trust of many people in international organizations has been eroded and ... multilateralism has been in the fire.” 
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, 73rd session of the UN General Assembly.

The UN today seems to aspire to large bureaucracies in countries with very low literacy rates. It has welcomed Iran’s Minister of Justice, Seyyed Alireza Avaei, to address the UN Human Rights Council and appointed Iran to the UN’s Global Women’s Rights Commission. Its Security Council often complacent and the UN representative body often made incompetent from member State’s unwillingness to participate.

If one of the UN’s main obligations is to secure and promote humanity’s common aspirations, then we should ask ourselves why multilateralism is under threat from rising income inequalities, geopolitical tensions, voluntary and forced population migrations, as well as technological evolutions. While the institutional entities (World Bank, WTO and G20, etc.) are slowly pacing to charter a new course in sustainability, the populous has taken matters into their own hands. Today, we see collaborative production models rampant. Network governance with peer-sourced computing (e.g., blockchain) is gaining a foothold to unsettle the financial services sector. Crowdsourcing is primed for the big time with the likes of Wiki, Kickstarter, and now Bell¿ngcats. 

A key stakeholder of, or even a defender of the UN would argue against any alternatives to the UN, as no other entity like it has yet to emerge which grants buy-in from sovereign states. But the implicit assumption is that a sovereignty is vested with power from the center and within its government. As the American experiment with democracy which is based on the premise that power is vested in its people, perhaps a new global identity is emerging: from the ashes of the old, a new way of thinking—about network versus hierarchy, about collaboration versus conformation, and about membership privilege for profiteering versus participation for value gained—a new alternative in “We the peoples of the United Nations.”

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Passing Ships in the Night

We are a nation of disconnected people. We pass each other on the street without acknowledging one another. We pride ourselves on our Twitter followers and Facebook friends, but those have made our lives more narcissistic at best. We share not to be connected but to be ‘liked’ or ‘retwitted’—such is a nation divided, and “we pass each other with our lights out as ships in the night.”[1]

This ‘culture’ of ours is a disease. A cancer. It creates an experience of loneliness similar to patients in hospitals feel: supposedly there to be healed, but their isolation from the world undermines their will to live. Many people live their lives this way, sharing homes, jobs, and even families with others, but not connecting—a profound seclusion gets in the way and we are each alone.

Confronting this ‘super connected culture of digital send’ we have to begin to listen and ‘receive’ one another; in real places where we are genuinely met and heard. These places are of great importance to us. Being there reminds us of our strength and our value in ways that many other places we may pass through do not. These are holy places, churches, schools, bus stops, funeral homes, etc. They remind us we are each human and together a community; mortal at best but forever in each other’s presence. They give us the strength to grow and eventually help us to transform pain into wisdom that we can pass on.

No more of living and sending disconnected messages of ourselves. It is time to tell stories about who we are and where we call home, time to be connected and live to let live in one another’s world.

______________________________

1.  Achel Naomi Remen, M.D., KITCHEN TABLE WISDOM, A Way of Life, (“We all influence one another. We are part of each other’s reality There is no such thing as passing someone and not acknowledging your moment of connection, not letting others know their effect on you and seeing yours on them. . .”).

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Blockchain for Change?

Blockchain has been tossed around as the next great disruption and THE tech revolution. It has been referred to as a public ledger, an open database, an unhackable consensus platform, and people have gone as far as to claim “all is possible” to change the world with blockchain.

But what exactly is it and why the hype?

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Trust and Involve - by Lauren Campbell-Kong

“Tell me, and I will Forget. Show me, and I may Remember. Involve me, and I will Understand.” -Chinese Proverb
Belief and trust is of growing importance in the world of business. Authenticity and transparency are key drivers in client development. Long gone are the days of nickel and diming, as well as developing client reliance on your services or maximizing profit through unethical economics. In an era of social purpose and social enterprise, transparency and activism have combined to create a business equation around fulfillment.

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Liberty, Unity, and Justice – the rights of communities and a manifestation of the “care economy” in these United States.

When in the course of modern politics, we arrive at a turning point of corrupt politicians and dangerous fanatic representations, we must come together as free and independent thinkers united in our hope for better things. Our promise for progress must be centred around people, as all lives matter; and we must be sensitive to the values of social and environmental justice, as they must be enabled by the fairly elected public servants along side of well-functioning and socially responsible institutions, both equally charged with the province of representing their people well in these times.

Friday, April 8, 2016

Shared Information Economy - a Reframe

McKinsey & Company recently wrote that business innovation involves identifying and dissecting long-held beliefs about how value is created and the reframing these beliefs in order to innovate. One of the most long-held beliefs in business is the concept of exclusivity in ownership. However, the mere suggestion of re-examining intellectual property ownership (e.g., patent)’s role in business is controversial. It often draws criticism and a fear of losing private-sector funding. There is also a lucrative cottage industry of non-market participants (e.g., patent trolls), which likely will impact the conversation.

But any meaningful dialogue about change and business innovation must involve opening information and must involve a closer look at how intellectual properties (e.g., patents) are leveraged in the development process.