Saturday, October 29, 2016

Passing Ships in the Night

We are a nation of disconnected people. We pass each other on the street without acknowledging one another. We pride ourselves on our Twitter followers and Facebook friends, but those have made our lives more narcissistic at best. We share not to be connected but to be ‘liked’ or ‘retwitted’—such is a nation divided, and “we pass each other with our lights out as ships in the night.”[1]

This ‘culture’ of ours is a disease. A cancer. It creates an experience of loneliness similar to patients in hospitals feel: supposedly there to be healed, but their isolation from the world undermines their will to live. Many people live their lives this way, sharing homes, jobs, and even families with others, but not connecting—a profound seclusion gets in the way and we are each alone.

Confronting this ‘super connected culture of digital send’ we have to begin to listen and ‘receive’ one another; in real places where we are genuinely met and heard. These places are of great importance to us. Being there reminds us of our strength and our value in ways that many other places we may pass through do not. These are holy places, churches, schools, bus stops, funeral homes, etc. They remind us we are each human and together a community; mortal at best but forever in each other’s presence. They give us the strength to grow and eventually help us to transform pain into wisdom that we can pass on.

No more of living and sending disconnected messages of ourselves. It is time to tell stories about who we are and where we call home, time to be connected and live to let live in one another’s world.

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1.  Achel Naomi Remen, M.D., KITCHEN TABLE WISDOM, A Way of Life, (“We all influence one another. We are part of each other’s reality There is no such thing as passing someone and not acknowledging your moment of connection, not letting others know their effect on you and seeing yours on them. . .”).

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